Author: stephanievaonis

Tips & News

Vespera, Vaonis’s newborn star

CONTENT

  1. Vespera
  2. What are the differences with Stellina ?
  3. Photos
  4. Frequently asked questions
  5. Press & media Kit

1. Vespera

Two years after the launch of Stellina, Vaonis is pleased to present its new creation, Vespera. Our team has put all of Stellina’s technology into a smaller, lighter but also more affordable version to make astronomy even more accessible.

We have highlighted the essential and the best of Stellina to design Vespera, which still offers the same simplicity of use, thanks to its initialization, automatic pointing and tracking system, its intelligent and very powerful image processing.

Vespera is designed for everyone, for sky lovers looking for simplicity and unforgettable experiences to share. As for Stellina, the instrument offers more manual possibilities (image processing), as well as a larger aperture and resolution.

Go to the Kickstarter page  to join the community on a new odyssey!

2. What are the differences with Stellina ?

Vespera

Stellina

Weight

5 kg (11 lbs)

11,2 kg (24,7 lbs)

Height

40 cm (15 in)

49 cm (19 in)

Width

20 cm (8 in)

39 cm (15 in)

Depth

9 cm (3.5 in)

13 cm (4.7 in)

Lens

Apochromatic Quadruplet

Apochromatic Doublet

Lens special features

Extra low dispersion
S-FPL52 equivalent (ULD)
with lanthanum glass

Very low dispersion
S-FPL51 equivalent (ED)
with lanthanum glass

Aperture

50 mm

80 mm

Focal length

200 mm

400 mm

Focal ratio

F/4

F/5

Field of view

1.6° x 0.9°

1° x 0.7°

Mount

Alt-azimutale

Alt-azimutale

Field derotator

 

Image sensor

Sony IMX462

Sony IMX178

Resolution

1920 x 1080 (2MP)

3072 x 2080 (6,4MP)

Sensor size

1/2.8”

1/1.8”

File formats

JPEG, TIFF, FITS

JPEG, TIFF, FITS

USB port (pictures download)


(with Wi-Fi)

 

Auto focus

 

 

Light pollution filter

Optional

 

Dew control

Optional

 

Temperature/humidity sensor

 

Battery type

Integrated

External (powerbank)

Battery life

4h

5h

Water Resistance

IP43

IP53

Multi user mode

Up to 5 users

Up to 10 users

 2021/2022 Developments

Solar pointing

Connected battery

Connection to Wi-Fi hotspots

Scheduling of observations

Up to 3 objets

Unlimited

Expert Mode (camera control)

HDR Image processing

Pictures stocking in the app

Up to 100 images

Up to 100 images

Mosaic Mode

5x sensor field

16x sensor field


Resolution difference (proportionally)

M27 Dumbbell nebula Vespera

Photo captured by Vespera (original size: 1920×1080)

 

M27 Dumbbell nebula Stellina

Photo captured by Stellina (original size: 2900×1972)


Size difference

3. Photos

Vespera’s development is ongoing. Photos were taken with the first prototypes in a peri-urban environment, Bortle 6. Click to enlarge the pictures.

Exposure time :
M31 Andromeda Galaxy: 177x10s (30min) – M13 Hercules Cluster: 177x10s (30min) – NGC6992 Veil Nebula: 330x10s (55min)
Moon: live – M27 Dumbbell Nebula: 177x10s (30min) – M42 Orion Nebula: 200x10s (33min)

4. Frequently asked questions

Is Stellina more powerful than Vespera? Does it offer a better photo quality?
You can find all the answers to your questions (pre-orders, deliveries, techniques) on this page :

https://desk.zoho.eu/portal/vaonis/fr/kb/vaonis

5. Press & media Kit

We put at the disposal of journalists, influencers, partners and associations :

  • a general presentation (10 slides)
  • a press release
  • photos
  • videos
  • photos taken by Vespera

Access the folder by clicking here.

Travel journal

Friday, April 3

01:00AM
At first, we thought that someone had thrown a snowball on our lens. But is was not melting. The smear became crispier, ready to bang in the universe.

Object: NGC 5139 Omega Centauri
Date: 03/04/20
Stacked images: 147x10s
Total exposure time: 24min
Location: Namibia
Author: The Adventurer of the Third Planet for Vaonis

Travel journal

Thursday, March 19

11:46PM
We were cruising through the Carina, heading to HD95358 star’s station for a research project, when we got lost on our way, deviated by unexpected interstellar winds. It was darkness into darkness, a space where time seemed like it has never begun. We managed to find our way back, annoting our discovery in our journal, determined to unveil the secrets of this dark nebula some day.

Object: Dark nebula near HD95358
Date:
19/03/20
Stacked images:
761x10s
Total exposure time:
2 hours and 7 minutes
Location:
Chile
Author:
Vaonis

Travel journal

Wednesday, February 26

10:23PM
We thought we had discovered two dusty seashells in the midst of the sky. Around them, tiny lights sparkling like cristals in the sand. Estimating their distance to be 12 million light-years away, we prepared our engine for a long road at the speed of light.
Half-way, we spot a bizarre object: an intriguing cone. A Brownish red, as though wrapped in crispy dried leaves. It seems to be burning from one end. It was not a seashell after all… We could smell its warm flavors.

Object: M81 Bode’s Galaxy (left) M82 Cigar Galaxy (right)
Date:
26/02/20
Stacked images:
230x10s
Total exposure time:
38 minutes
Location:
Montpellier, France
Author:
Vaonis

Travel journal

Friday, January 17

00:50AM
Acid pink winds, electric green shades, and frosty gray haze… In the winter sky, Pierik witnessed a whirlwind of color, drawn by a majestuous large-winged celestial butterfly swirling across the stars, ready to perpetuate the stellar life cycle. There you are: the Orion nebula cradling new-born stars.

Object: M42 Orion Nebula
Date: 17/01/20
Total exposure time: 50min
Location: Switzerland
Author: Pierik F.

Captured with #myStellina, processed manually with astrophotography softwares.

NGC7635 Nébuleuse de la Bulle by STELLINA
Travel journal

Monday, December 16

10:53PM
Travel to 8000 light years under the sea. We would almost be tempted to catch the cosmic bubbles escaping from the depths of space to hear them pop in this environment where silence prevails. The NGC7635 bubble reaches more than 35,000 degrees, we step back and let ourselves simply be entertained by the ballet of bubbles and stars offered by Cassiopeia.

NGC7635 Nébuleuse de la Bulle by STELLINA

Object: NGC7635 Bubble nebula
Date:
16/12/19
Stacked images:
600x10s
Total exposure time:
1 hour and 41 minutes
Location:
Paris region
Authors:
Jean-Marc L. (capture), Astroguigeek (image processing)

This picture has been manually processed using the raw images of STELLINA.
Softwares used:  Deep Sky Stacker (stacking), Lightroom and Photoshop.

Travel journal

Monday, November 25

12:58AM
Simple witnesses to a world in which we have everything to discover, we observe the storms growling through the cosmos. Balls of energy about to explode, beams of flaming saber clashes in the night, a real cosmic battle is taking place in the distance, creating thick clouds of gas and dust. Suddenly we see a silhouette pierce the sky at the speed of lightning. It wears a winged helmet which we have often heard about. Thor has arrived.

Object: NGC 2359 Thor’s Helmet nebula
Date:
25/11/19
Stacked images:
1440x10s
Total exposure time:
4 hours
Location:
Chile
Author:
Vaonis

Travel journal

Tuesday, October 8

11:49PM
We’re off on an expedition through the nebula Barnard 33, a mysterious region of the Orion constellation. In the distance, it looks as though a thick black cloud of gas and dust is spreading, progressively covering the burning sky. Moments pass, we hear the galloping and hedging of a horse. A shape appears: the head of a lonely horse popping out of the ragged clouds. We are witnessing a ghost rider in the sky.

Object: B33 Horsehead nebula
Date:
08/10/19
Stacked images:
186x15s
Total exposure time:
46min
Location:
Chile
Author: 
Vaonis

Travel journal

Sunday, July 14

03:16AM
We set our course on the Large Magellanic Cloud. We met what seemed to be a big 6-legged spider. Long legs, gleaming body, swallowing the stars on its way. It was as frightening as it was fascinating. Should we approach it?

Object: NGC2070 Tarentula nebula
Date:
14/07/19
Stacked images:
Total exposure time:
Location:
Author: 
Vaonis